UX, Design and Research are critical core functions for fintech

Fintech is buzzing

Financial services in general have been undergoing significant change for some time driven by digital technologies. The ongoing closure of high street bank branches has been a matter of much public comment. The application of new technologies to financial services has generated the term ‘fintech’, and there’s a lot going on. It’s fascinating There are some companies offering the same services as have existed for a long time – such as insurance or lending – and using tech to drive down the costs for the end customer. There are others using tech to offer something a bit different.

Whatever the business though, it’s not enough to have a good idea or even a good execution Whereas in previous times transactions were always mediated by people – over the counter or the phone – who could provide a buffer to clunky systems and terminology, with digital the user interface has to be good enough, and can be a competitive advantage in its own right. If customers can’t navigate your system, you’re out of business.

Digital coin exchanges

Here’s an example from digital coin exchanges.

This is an extract of Bitrex homepage. Erm…. maybe they are just targeting expert traders who know them and know what they do. They aren’t going to suck in many mainstream investors. ‘Explore markets’??? What markets? Sign up for what?

Bittrex section of homepage

Their homepage blurb is this.

Lloyds mortgage page

There’s an obvious difference in apparent complexity between these designs. The aim should be to make it easy for any individual to find their path. The first two designs would seem to achieve that aim. With Lloyds, should I go to ‘Find out more’ or one of the other choices? Is this the right place to tell prospective customers that their homes may be repossessed?What’s all that legal-looking text at the top about? And what’s a ‘Club Lloyds current account customer’ that gets a discount? How can I be one? There’s no information here.

Lloyds are talking to Club Lloyds customers at this point, but what about everyone else? At British Airways there are benefits for members of The Executive Club – the airline’s frequent flyer scheme (despite its name anyone can join for free and earn miles). Around the site there would be, for example, a description of how to choose a seat, with a rider of ‘and Executive Club members can do x’. It was aimed at Executive Club members who (mostly) knew that they were a member. However, many non-members didn’t know if they were members or not – or how to become one. It’s important when presenting messages to think not only of the people who it’s for, but also the people who it’s not for, and to provide supporting information where needed. In Lloyds case it would help if there was some in-context information available (such as a mouseover) that could inform the curious customer as to what a ‘Club Lloyds current account customer’ is.

Borderless banking

There are a growing number of digital nomads working remotely and moving around the globe, and so more borderless bank accounts are appearing, along with other methods of cheaply moving money across borders.

ipagoo┬áhave a multi country account, and TransferWise has recently added a ‘borderless account’ to their list of services.

The ipagoo website needs work. The contrast of the text to background is poor making it hard to read and key information doesn’t stand out. Also, one of the obvious questions that digital nomads will ask is ‘what countries does this account work in?’. Where can I get paid? It’s not obvious how to get that information on the ipagoo site. Here’s part of their homepage.

ipagoo home

There are no obvious navigation options to tell me which countries I can get paid in. I spent some time looking around but ultimately I had to contact the company to find out. You have to ‘apply now’, which is counter-intuitive. I don’t want to apply yet, I want more information.

Here’s what you get on the apply now page.

ipagoo apply now

Even more oddly, you now have to click the link to find out if you are eligible for an account. This is structured the way the company thinks about it – not the way that customers think. From ipagoo’s point of view, if you aren’t in one of the listed countries, you’re not eligible. But it doesn’t help customers to structure the information that way.

Here’s what you get if you click the link.

ipgoo eligibility page

At last, here’s the list, but I would never have found it and I would never have opened an account.

By contrast TransferWise present the information in a more customer-friendly way.

TransferWise information

There’s a summary right there as to which countries are covered.

HSBC do offer an account that does something similar, but there is a list of eligibility criteria that will exclude many of the new generation of international workers, some of whom will end up rich but sticking with the new players. Maybe HSBC have their eye on this but history is littered with the remains of businesses that didn’t move early enough to deal with challengers.

UX, Design, and Research are critical functions for fintech

Fintech startups and established businesses, like all digital businesses, need to treat the customer experience as a core business competency. That means doing the research to understand the customer perspective – what information does the customer need along the way? Can they find it easily? Can the customer transact easily? Does the design reflect brand values and support the usability?

That means recruiting and keeping specialists who know how to do this stuff. Good UX/UI and research people will be able to apply their skills across business domains.

A founder or CEO who thinks they know what a user interface should look like, or how it should work, and thinks they don’t need design expertise is unlikely to be the success they think they should be.